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Stat Mechanics

  Attributes
  Base Stats
  Wild Stat Formula
  Wild Stat DV Formula
  Wild HP Formula
  Wild HP DV Formula
  Real / Apparent Stats
  Experience Points
  Stat Experience
  Stat Enhancers
  The Box Trick
  Domestic Maximum Stat Formula
  Domestic Maximum DV Formula
  Domestic Maximum HP Formula
  Domestic Maximum HP DV Formula
  Max Stats
  PokeRUS
  Pokemon Happiness
  Breeding Information
  Pokemon Genders

Attributes

Each Pokemon in Red, Blue, and Yellow have five Attributes, or Stats: HP, Attack, Defense, Speed, and Special. In Gold, Silver, and Crystal, the Special Attribute is split into Special Attack and Special Defense, creating six Attributes for these three games. Each Stat plays on important role in the game:

 HP – This stat is the most important Stat in the games. HP, or Hit Points, is what determines how long a Pokemon can stay in battle. In battle, each Pokemon attempts to lower the enemy’s HP to 0, which will cause the enemy to faint. A fainted Pokemon cannot participate in battle, for it does nor have enough strength to Battle. To restore HP, you must do one of two things: 1) Take it to a Pokemon Center where a nurse will revive the Pokemon and return it to full strength, or 2) Use an Item on the Pokemon that will Revive it. Only Revive and Max Revive can heal a fainted Pokemon in RBY, while there are many items that can restore HP before all HP is gone. In GSC, Sacred Ash has the power to Revive all fainted Pokemon and heal them to their Max HP. The other items can only restore one Pokemon. However, there is only one Sacred Ash in the game (attached to Ho-oh in the Metalloids), while you can buy Revive in Poke Marts and find multiple Max Revives while walking around. Once all of a person’s Pokemon are defeated, that person loses the match and immediately black’s out. When they awake, they find themselves outside the last Pokemon Center they used, Pokemon healed, with half of his or her money missing. The person who wins gets a set amount of money from the enemy and returns to the spot where the battle started. How to determine this amount is discussed later.

Attack – This, coupled with Special (Special Attack in GSC) helps determine the strength of an attack. The Attack Stat helps determine the strength of Physical Attacks don to the enemy. The Physical Types are: Normal, Fighting, Flying, Poison, Ground, Rock, Bug, Ghost, and Steel. The stronger this Stat, the Stronger the Physical Damage.

Defense – This, coupled with Special (Special Defense in GSC) helps determine how resistant to damage you are. The Defense Stat helps determine how resistant you Pokemon is to Physical Attacks. The stronger this Stat is, the stronger the resistance will be.

Speed – This is the second most important stat, behind HP. It doesn’t modify any variable in the Damage Formula. What it does, though, is still important. Speed determines who will go first in a battle. The higher the Speed, the more likely you will attack first.

Special – I know that in GSC Special has been split. To keep matters simple, I will only discus Special in this text (as the information applies to both Special Attack and Special Defense). Special deals damage and adjusts resistance to Special Attacks. Special Attack and Special Defense are to Special Type Attacks as Attack and Defense are to Physical Type Attacks. The Special Types of Attacks are: Fire, Water, Grass, Electric, Psychic, Ice, Dragon, and Dark.

Base Stats

Each stat for each Pokemon has its own number stored in the memory. These numbers are called “Base Stats”. Base Stats are what determine the maximum stat for a Pokemon. The higher a Base Stat, the higher the corresponding stat is. This is why all Mewtwo’s Special Attacks are so high; their Base Special Attack is also very high. Here is a list of all the Base Stats for all the Pokemon:

Base Stats

Diversification Value (DV) / Individual Value (IV) / Genetics (Genes)

Also, besides Base Stats, there are random numbers that make one certain Pokemon stronger or weaker in certain areas. These are called Diversification Values, DV‘s, IV’s, Genes, and a lot of other names. No matter what you call them, they still do the same thing. DV’s, as I refer to them, randomize each stat by a certain amount. The DV’s are restricted to 16 levels of strength, from 0 to 15. Almost every Stat has its own DV: Attack, Defense, Speed, and Special, which is used in both Special Attack and Special Defense. HP is different, though. The HP DV is based on the other four DV’s. If the Attack DV is odd, add 8 to the HP DV. If the Defense DV is odd, add 4 to the HP DV. If the Speed DV is odd, add 2 to the HP DV. If the Special DV is odd, add 1 to the HP DV. DV’s can add at most 30 points to a stat at Level 100. These DV’s are set when you receive the Pokemon. They can’t be changed.

Wild Stat Formula

To help you plan your team better, I am including the Wild Stat Formula. With this you can figure out what a Pokemon’s stat will be when you catch it, as long as you can guess the DV’s. The formula isn’t too complicated, but you need to know a Pokemon’s Base Stat, DV, and Level. I gave you the Base Stats, DV’s are hidden, and Level is clearly displayed. Here is the formula:

 W = int (B * L / 50 + 5 + D * L / 50)

where W is the Wild Stat, L is the Level, B is the Base Stat, and D is the DV. This formula works for all stats except HP, which has its own formula that I will discuss in a minute. Note: This is the actual formula used in the game (minus a little bit about Effort Level and such, but that comes later).

Wild Stat DV Formula

Well, the last formula won’t work without a DV, and unless you have a Gameshark or an emulator, you have no clue what it is. I reversed the Wild Stat Formula to create the Wild Stat DV Formula. Here it is:

D = int ( 50 * ( W – 5) / L ) – B

where D is the DV, W is the Wild Stat, L is the Level, and B is the Base Stat. This formula works best for Pokemon at or above Level 50. Again, this won’t work for HP.

Wild HP Formula

For some reason, the programmers used a separate formula to calculate HP. I guess it was because of memory restrictions. Well, any way, here is the HP formula:

W = int ( B * L / 50 + L + 10 + D * L / 50 )

Where W is the Wild HP, L is the Level, B is the Base HP, and D is the DV. Notice how similar this and the Wild Stat Formula are. All the HP formula does is add a little more extra to the HP than would normally be there. Note: This is the actual formula used in the game (minus a little dealing with Effort Level, which will be explained later).

Wild HP DV Formula

I know I already described how to find other Stat DV’s and I also explained how to use them to find the HP DV with them. But, just for fun, I also reversed the Wild HP Formula. Here is the Wild HP DV formula:

D = int ( 50 * ( W – 10 ) / L ) – B – 50

Where D is the HP DV, W is the Wild HP, L is the Level and B is the Base HP. Again, try to only use it with Pokemon at or above Level 50.

Real / Apparent Stats

When you are looking at a Pokemon’s Stats, you actually only see a rounded down version of their Stats. They actually have a decimal value that can’t be viewed. This makes finding strong Pokemon hard, especially at low levels. Below Level 50, the DV differences are less than 1 point apart, making it extremely hard to calculate DV’s. Above Level 50, the margin is greater than 1 point. That is why I asked that only Pokemon at or above Level 50 be used in the DV formulas.

Experience Points

Now that we know a lot about the Stats of a Pokemon, let’s look at the Level value, which is determined based off of the amount of Experience Points a Pokemon has. Each Pokemon has a maximum amount of Exp. Points he or she can earn. Once they reach this max, their level can’t rise anymore, which is Level 100. Although any Pokemon can grow to Level 100, they all don’t need the same experience points. Within a family line, the rates stay the same. There are four different Levels of experience points. Every Pokemon uses one of these 4 Levels:

1. Fast – Pokemon in this group grow fast and don’t take long to max their Level. Most of the Pokemon at this Level aren’t very strong, though. Use the following formula to determine the amount of experience needed to get to a certain Level:

E = int ( 0.8 * ( L ^ 3 ))

Where E is the experience required and L is the Level. Pokemon families in this group include:

Aipom, Igglybuff, Smeargle, Chansey, Cleffa, Snubbull, Ledyba, Togepi, Corsola, Marill, Delibird, Spinarak, and Misdreavus.

2. Medium – Pokemon in this group grow slower than fast Pokemon, but still are faster than other Pokemon. These Pokemon are generally stronger than Fast Pokemon. Use the following formula to determine the amount of experience needed to get to a certain Level:

E = int ( L ^ 3 )

Where E is the experience required and L is the Level. Pokemon families in this group include:

Ditto, Dunsparce, Lickitung, Sentret, Porygon, Rattata, Kangaskhan, Eevee, Farfetch’d, Butterfree, Yanma, Hoothoot, Spearow, Doduo, Zubat, Sudowoodo, Diglett, Cubone, Phanpy, Sandshrew, Omanyte, Kabuto, Unown, Mr. Mime, Wobbuffet, Girafarig, Drowzee, Slowpoke, Natu, Tangela, Paras, Pichu, Elekid, Voltorb, Magnemite, Tyrogue, Mankey, Vulpix, Magby, Slugma, Ponyta, Remoraid, Krabby, Goldeen, Psyduck, Wooper, Smoochum, Horsea, Seel, Qwilfish, Weedle, Ekans, Venonat, Grimer, Koffing, Meowth, Teddiursa, Onix, Scyther, and Pineco.

3. Slow – Pokemon in this group grow slower than any other Pokemon. Also, some of the Pokemon here are the most powerful in the game. Use the following formula to determine the amount of experience needed to get to a certain Level:

E = int ( 1.25 * ( L ^ 3 ))

Where E is the experience required and L is the Level. Pokemon families in this group include:

Stantler, Snorlax, Tauros, Miltank, Aerodactyl, Rhyhorn, Staryu, Exeggcute, Chinchou, Pinsir, Heracross, Growlithe, Mantine, Lapras, Magikarp, Shellder, Swinub, Dratini, Tentacool, Houndour, Larvitar, Skarmory, Articuno, Zapdos, Moltres, Entei, Raikou, Suicune, Lugia, Ho-oh, and Mewtwo.

4. Parabolic – Pokemon in this group grow strangely. They start off faster than Fast Pokemon, but by Level 100 they are almost as slow as Slow Pokemon. Also, most of the Pokemon here start-off as semi-weak fighters but grow to powerhouses. Use the following formula to determine the amount of experience needed to get to a certain Level:

E = int ( 1.2 * ( L ^ 3 ) – 15 * ( L ^ 2 ) + 100 * L – 140 )

Where E is the experience required and L is the Level. Pokemon families in the group include:

Gligar, Pidgey, Shuckle, Geodude, Abra, Sunkern, Bellsprout, Hoppip, Oddish, Bulbasaur, Chikorita, Mareep, Poliwag, Machop, Cyndaquil, Charmander, Totodile, Squirtle, Nidoran (Male and Female), Murkrow, Sneasel, Gastly, Mew, and Celebi.

  Rare Candies

Giving a Rare Candy to a Pokemon gives it only enough experience points to raise to the next Level. Therefore, if your Pokemon only has a few experience points to the next level, don’t waste you Rare Candy. Save it to use later on down the road. They won’t give you a boost in stats like battling will, though. They only give Exp. Points.

  Exp. All & Exp. Share

These items allow you to share the experience one Pokemon receives. The Exp. All items in RBY take half of the total experience received from a Pokemon and distribute it evenly between the Pokemon in your team. If it has a decimal part in the divided out experience, it drops off the decimal part. The Exp. Share item is GSC does the same thing, just for the Pokemon it is attached to. These items also share the “battle boost” Pokemon get for battling.

  Piggybacking

“Piggybacking” is a method of raising a low level Pokemon by “fighting” a higher Level Pokemon without getting hurt. To do this, put your low level Pokemon at the top of the line-up. Get into a battle with a higher Level Pokemon. Once the battle screen is up, switch to a higher Level Pokemon and let them take the hit. Then kill the Pokemon. Your low Level Pokemon will get half the experience from the battle. This is a quick way to raise a low Level Pokemon.

  Day Care

The Day Care buildings house people that will raise your Pokemon for you. While a Pokemon is with them, they gain 1 experience point per step you take. When you place a Pokemon in Day Care, their experience is lowered to their Level minimum. This is a good way to keep a Pokemon from growing levels for Cup Battles. Again, you get no “battle boost”.

Traded Pokemon & Exp. Points

Pokemon you receive in trade gain extra experience that normal Pokemon don’t. Traded Pokemon receive a 50 % bonus with all experience received. This means that a traded Pokemon will grow a lot faster than a normally caught one. The problem with this is unless you have the right badge, a traded Pokemon will not listen to you. A Pokemon is said to be traded if its ID does not match the trainers.

Stat Experience

Up till now, I have been using the term “battle boost” in the definition of other terms, but have yet to tell what this “battle boost” is. “Battle boost” is a term I gave to Stat Experience (or Effort Value, as Meowth346 refers to it). Just as you Level is calculated based off of your Experience Points, you Stats are calculated partly off of your Stat Experience. Stats also use your Level, Base Stats, and DV’s. Stat Experience just adds some extra points to your stats (these points are called you Effort Level by Meowth346). At most at Level 50, it can add 31 points. At Level 100, it can add 63 points max. The maximum amount of Stat Experience you can earn is 65,535, but can only use 65,025 of it. You gain Stat Experience in each stat that has an applicable DV. You gain Stat Experience equal to the Base Stats of the enemy. For example, to gain a lot of Stat Experience in HP, fight a lot of Chansey and Blissey’s because they have high Base Stats in HP. There is only one Special Stat Experience, and that comes from enemies Base Special Attack.

Stat Enhancers

Stat Enhancers are the expensive items like HP UP and Carbos that boost your stats. What these items do is give its respective stat 2,550 extra Stat Exp. It then immediately recalculates your stats. You can only gain an extra 25,500 Stat Exp. Points with these boosters (or can only use 10 of each booster). Also, if your Pokemon hits the maximum amount of Stat Exp. before all boosters are used, it can’t use any more. These boosts are very much worth the money the cost. 25,500 Stat Experience is close to half of the maximum value.

To better understand stat mechanics, here is the Stat Experience points formula (or the Effort Level to Effort Value formula):

E = 64 * ( 50 * P / L ) ^ 2 – 16 ( 50 * P / L ) + 2

Where E is the necessary stat experience (Effort Value), P is the amount of extra stat points (Effort Level) wanted, and L is the Level. Use this formula to see how long is would take to fully train a Pokemon. The next formula can take the amount of stat experience you have and tell you how many extra stat points you receive ( or this formula changes Effort Values back to Effort Levels):

P = ( L * (( 16 + SQRT ( 256 * E – 512 )) / 128 ) / 50 )

Where P is the extra stat points (Effort Level) you will gain, L is you Level, and E is the amount of stat experience (Effort Value) you have. If you add this to the Wild Stat Formula, you can calculate you exact stat. Just as a warning, don’t put anything less than 2 in for E, otherwise you will try to take the square root of a negative number. Just a precaution.

The Box Trick

The Box Trick is a quirk in Pokemon that helps trainers out. It is a common belief that once a Pokemon reaches Level 100, its stats can no longer grow. But, thanks to the Box Trick, that is no longer a problem. What you do is take a Level 100 Pokemon, take it through a lot of battles, then box it and unbox it. Its stats should have risen by a few points. This trick can help a lot in raising stats for the Stadium Cups. It also can make up for poor training. It can’t raise a Pokemon past its own personal max in stats, though. How it works is when you deposit a Pokemon in a box, certain values are saved, while others aren’t. Stat Experience is saved, but you current stats aren’t. They are recalculated based off of your Stat Experience. This allows the Box Trick to work.

 

Domestic Maximum Stat Formula

Just as I gave a Wild Stat Formula, I will also give you the Domestic Maximum Stat Formula, which you can use to determine your Pokemon’s Maximum stat at a certain level with a certain DV. This will help you figure out what you Pokemon’s stats will be when they are fully trained. This formula only applies then.

M = int ( (B * L / 50) + 5 + (D * L / 50) + (63 * L / 100) )

Where M is the Max Stat, L is the Level, B is the Base Stat, and D is the DV. Again, it is different. This formula is very similar to the Wild Stat formula, except it adds a variable (63 * L / 100) to the end of the equation. When you multiply them both out, there will be a 63 point difference at Level 100. Note: This is almost the actual formula in the game in its entirety. The only difference is to change the 63 near the end to a variable. It holds what ever Effort Level your Pokemon just happens to be at.

Domestic Maximum DV Formula

Just to make your life a little easier, hopefully, here is the Domestic Maximum DV Formula. Again, this will only work for a fully trained Pokemon. Anything else won’t work.

D = int (( 50 * ( M – 5 ) / L ) – B – 31.99999 )

Where D is the DV, M is the Max Stat, L is the Level, and B is the Base Stat. Again, this won’t work on HP.

Domestic Maximum HP Formula

This is the formula you would use to calculate your maximum HP when you are fully trained.

M = int ( (B * L / 50) + L + 10 + (D * L / 50) + (63 * L / 100) )

Where M is the Max HP, L is the Level, B is the Base HP, and D is the DV. This formula is almost the exact same formula as the Wild HP Formula, just with small differences. Note: This is the actual formula in the game, with one minor difference: Take the 63 near the end, and replace with a variable. This variable is the Effort Level of the Pokemon (See Stat Experience for info on Effort Level and such, not to mention on PokéFor).

Domestic Maximum HP DV Formula

I know this formula isn’t really necessary with all the other information I have given you, but this may help you in the long run:

D = int (( 50 * ( M – 10 ) / L ) – B – 31.99999 )

where D is the DV, M is the Max HP, L is the Level, and B is the Base HP.

Max Stats

By now, you should understand the concept of Max Stats. Each Pokemon has a max that their stats can be. For example, any Mewtwo can’t get past 406 in its Special Attack rating. Also, Chansey’s Max HP is 703. There is a list of each Pokemon’s Max Stat at PokeDaily. It is even categorized from highest to lowest and lists them by each stat separately. Still has some Japanese names on it, though.

PokeRUS

When battling, there is a 3 in 35,536 chance that your Pokemon will catch a virus. Don’t panic! This virus doesn’t hurt your Pokemon, but actually helps them. You’ll know you have this virus in one of several ways. The simplest is that your status screen will say “PokéRUS” instead of “Normal”. Second, if this is your first time having the virus, Nurse Joy will have a special message for you. After you leave the PokeCenter, Prof. Elm will call you with a special message. After that, only the first method will work. If you place a Pokemon in a box while it is infected, it will stay infected. If the infected Pokemon is in your Party while you battle, the Pokemon next to them might become infected, too. An infected Pokemon stays infected for about 4 days of out of box time. Also, once the virus wears off, you are immune from getting it again. What the virus does is it doubles the amount of stat experience you receive from battles. Even when they are immune to it, Pokemon still receive the bonus.

Pokemon Happiness

In Pokemon Yellow, the Pikachu you get from the start of the game has a happiness rating. When you do certain things, his happiness would raise. In Gold, Silver, and Crystal, every Pokemon has a happiness rating. It isn’t easily viewable, though. To see a Pokemon’s happiness, put the Pokemon on the top of your belt and talk to a certain girl in Goldenrod City. She will say one of 6 possible messages:

Value

Girl:

Notes

250 ~ 255

It looks really happy! It must love you a lot.

 

200 ~ 249

I get the feeling that it really trusts you.

Pokemon that evolve through Happiness evolve at the stage, when the value is 218 or higher.

150 ~ 199

It's friendly towards you. It looks sort of happy.

 

100 ~ 149

It's quite cute.

"Return" can be gotten if it is more than this state.

50 ~ 99

You should treat it better. It's not used to you.

A Wild Pokemon starts at 70. Pokemon caught with Friend Balls start at 200. Pokemon hatched from an egg start at 120.

0 ~ 49

It doesn't seem to like you at all. It looks mean.

"Frustration" can be gotten.

Ok, now that we know approximately where the happiness is, what can we do to raise of lower the value? Time for another list!

Raise Happiness Actions

Change if Happ. is 0 ~ 99

100 ~ 199

200 ~ 255

Level Up*

+5

+3

+2

Doping Item (i.e. Protein, Carbos, Calcium, HP Up, Iron)

+5

+3

+2

?Rare Candy

+5?

+5?

+5?

Hair Shop (Older Bro.)

+1, +3, +5

+1, +3, +5

+1, +1, +2

Hair Shop (Younger Bro.)

+1, +3, +10

+1, +3, +10

+1, +1, +4

Daisy's Fur Grooming (only from 3 to 4 PM)

+3

+3

+1

?Teach a TM

+1?

+1?

+1?

Walk

+1 (every 256 steps)

+1 (every 256 steps)

+1 (every 256 steps)

Battle (Gym Leader, Elite Four, Lance, or Red)

Have on Belt +3

Have on Belt +3

Have on Belt +1

Lower Happiness Actions

Change if Happ. is 0 ~ 99

100 ~ 199

200 ~ 255

Use Energypowder

-5

-5

-10

Use Heal Powder

-5

-5

-10

Energy Root

-10

-10

-15

Revival Herb

-15

-15

-20

Faint in Battle (or from Poison, etc.)

-1

-1

-1

Trade

Returns to 70

Returns to 70

Returns to 70

Place in Stadium 2 Box

Returns to 70

Returns to 70

Returns to 70

These are the only ways to affect a Pokemon’s happiness. Anything else is a rumor. Also, happiness does not change randomly. If the Happiness is high, then the change is also high. If Happiness is low, then the change is low. Look at the messages list in the “Points” column for a rating. So, now that we know that, lets see how the haircut brothers help you. The happiness increase changes based on what day it is.

Message

Happiness

Percent Chance

[Pokemon] looks a little happier.

First Value

60%

[Pokemon] looks happy.

Middle Value

30%

[Pokemon] looks delighted!

Last Value

10%

Day of Week

Hairdresser

Change (if Happ is 199-)

Change (if Happ is 200+)

Sunday

Younger Bro.

+1, +3, +5

+1, +1, +2

Monday

Closed

+0

+0

Tuesday

Older Bro.

+1, +3, +10

+1, +1, +4

Wednesday

Younger Bro.

+1, +3, +5

+1, +1, +2

Thursday

Older Bro.

+1, +3, +10

+1, +1, +4

Friday

Younger Bro.

+1, +3, +5

+1, +1, +2

Saturday

Older Bro.

+1, +3, +10

+1, +1, +4

Also, in Crystal, when you catch a Pokemon, its “catch location” is remembered. When training there, your Pokemon will gain twice the happiness it normally gains. There is an old lady in Cianwood City who can tell you where you caught your Pokemon. This data will be lost if you trade the Pokemon over to RBGY versions, so be careful.

Breeding Information

Another new feature of Gold, Silver, and Crystal is the ability to breed. To breed two Pokemon together, they first must be able to breed. While most Pokemon can, a few can’t, like most legendary and baby Pokemon. Next, any Pokemon that is breedable can breed with Ditto, except two Ditto can’t breed. Next, if no Ditto is involved, check the following chart to see if two Pokemon are compatible:

Breeding Chart

The chart uses 2 number/letter characters to determine Pokemon compatibility. Basically, if the numbers match exactly, the breeding will be easy. Then, if any number/letter of one Pokemon matches the number/letter of another Pokemon, they can breed as well, just not as easily. So the first number/letters can match, the last number/letters can match, or a combination of the first number with the last number matching (ex. 5/E and 2/5, which are Ekans and Seel, respectively).

Ok, now that you have taken care of that, the final thing to take care of is two Pokemon that meet all requirements above, and one is not Ditto, they must have opposite genders. But, if two Pokemon have the same Defense DV, of their Special DV is the same or has a difference of 8, the two Pokemon cannot breed, as that is an indicator that the Pokemon are close relatives. You will see the message, “It’s brimming with energy,” whenever this occurs.

Ok, now let’s see how long breeding will take.

First, look at the Pokemon's specific species.
If they match, start with the number 254.
If they don't match, start with 128.

Next, look at their ID #'s.
If they match, subtract 77 from your number.
If they don't match, leave number alone.

Now, once you have given each Pokemon to the old couple who raise Pokemon, go into the corral with them. When you talk to them, they will display a message based on your answer from the other chart:

Answer

Message

255

It's brimming with energy

254-230

It shows interest in [Name].

229-70

It's friendly with [Name].

70-1

It appears to care for [Name].

0

It has no interest in [Name].

Now we wait for the egg. A random number is calculated, with the highest possible number being 255. Each time you take a step, this number is decreased by 1. When it hits 0, another random number is made. Again, it won’t be higher than 255. Ok, if the random number is higher than your calculated number, no egg is born. After that you start over the egg waiting process. But, if the random number is lower than your number, an egg will be made. The old man will be standing outside the house, in the corral. Talk to him to obtain your egg.

Now you have your egg. Now what? The baby Pokemon will either be the female species that was bred, or, if Ditto was used, whatever the opposite species from Ditto was. It will have 120 Happiness points when born. Based on what the baby is, it will take a lot of walking to hatch. Here is a chart to help you understand.

Value

Pokemon

Hatching Steps

5

Magikarp, Gyarados

1,280

10

Pichu, Pikachu, Raichu, Cleffa, Clefairy, Clefable, Igglybuff, Jigglypuff, Wigglytuff, Togepi, Togetic

2,560

15

Caterpie, Metapod, Butterfree, Weedle, Kakuna, Metapod, Pidgey, Pidgeotto, Pidgeot, Rattata, Raticate, Spearow, Fearow, Zubat, Golbat, Crobat, Geodude, Graveler, Golem, Sentret, Furret, Hoothoot, Noctowl, Ledyba, Ledian, Spinarak, Ariados

3,840

20

Any one not listed here.

5,120

25

Onix, Hitmonlee, Hitmonchan, Mr. Mime, Scyther,Jynx, Electabuzz, Magmar, Pinsir, Misdreavus, Steelix, Scizor, Heracross, Mantine, Scarmory, Tyrogue, Hitmontop, Smoochum, Elekid, Magby

6,400

30

Omanyte, Omastar, Kabuto, Kabutops

7,680

35

Eevee, Vaporeon, Jolteon, Flareon, Aerodactyl, Espeon, Umbreon

8,960

40

Chansey, Lapras, Snorlax, Dratini, Dragonair, Dragonite, Larvitar, Pupitar, Tyranitar

10,240

80

Articuno, Zapdos, Moltres, Raikou, Entei, Suicune

20,480

120

Mewtwo, Mew, Lugia, Ho-oh, Celebi

30,720

Basically, take the Value and multiply times 256.

What if you loose count? Meowth346 has provided a chart listing the different messages an egg will display, and approximately how much longer it has to go before it hatches. Note: the top message can not be obtained through normal gameplay:

Value

Message

Steps Left

FF-29

This EGG needs a lot more time to hatch.

65,280 - 10,496

28-0B

Wonder what's inside? It needs more time, though.

10,240 - 2,816

0A-06

It moves around inside sometimes. It must be close to hatching.

1,536 - 2,560

05-00

It's making sounds inside. It's going to hatch soon!

0 - 1,280

Ok, so now you ask, why breed? Well, for one, it is a quick way to get more of a certain Pokemon. Also, through breeding, many Pokemon learn new attacks. How a baby obtains these attacks have been determined thusly:

 The first source for attacks is the Pokemon’s Skill list. A Pokemon will know every attack that it would normally have at Level 5. Here is a list of how many open attack slots a baby will have after this.

Open Slots - Pokemon
0 - Wobbuffet, Girafarig
1 - Venonat, Grimer, Lapras, Porygon, Chinchou, Cleffa, Igglybuff, Hoppip, Snubbull
2 - Anyone not listed goes here.
3 - Sandshrew, Zubat, Oddish, Paras, Poliwag, Abra, Bellsprout, Tentacool, Geodude, Magnemite, Farfetch'd, Voltorb, Lickitung, Kangaskhan, Horsea, Mr. Mime, Pinsir, Magikarp, Aerodactyl, Snorlax, Ledyba, Murkrow, Gligar, Slugma, Swinub, Corsola, Remoraid, Delibird, Stantler, Smeargle, Tyrogue, Magby

The second source is Level Up attacks. If both parents know an attack the baby can learn from leveling up, then the baby will be born with the attack.

The third source is the main reason for breeding. Certain attacks are available to each breedable Pokemon only through breeding. If the father happens to know one of those attacks, the baby will be born with it. These also include moves taught by the Move Tutor in Crystal. Here is a breedable attack list included within the list of all the possible ways for Pokemon to learn moves:

Pokemon Attacks List

Note: Not all attacks listed can be obtained. For some reason, the game programmers made mistakes in the possible breed moves. Certain attacks can’t be obtained with other attacks, while others can’t be obtained at all. This makes this chart difficult to use. Basically, when thinking of a move to put on a Pokemon, check to see if it would be possible to get the move by making a breed chart that shows all the possible moves a Pokemon could learn through Breeding. Be sure to include things like only the male Pokemon can pass these attacks down, which tends to ruin some of Jynx’s bred moves, for example.

The forth source for attacks is TM/HM’s. If the father knows a GS or C TM/HM, then the baby will also know those moves.

 

Ok, now that that is out of the way, let’s discuss how a baby Pokemon can inherit DV’s. The Attack and Speed DV’s are randomly generated. The Defense and Part of the Special are figured from the opposite gender parent. In other words, if the baby is male, stats in those areas come from the mother. If the baby is female, stats in those areas come from the father. The Defense is exactly the parent’s, but Special is different.

If the Special DV is 0~7 then the Baby’s Special DV is either the Parents Special DV of that plus 8. If the Special DV is 8~15 then the Baby’s Special DV is either the Parents Special DV or that minus 8.

If there is a Ditto in the breeding pair, then it’s DV’s will be used.

Pokemon Genders

Ok, now we are up to the listing of each Pokemon’s gender ratio. Most Pokemon have a 50/50 rating, while some have a 100/0 rating. Others are more one-way than the other. Here is a full list(complements of NickWhiz) of gender ratios for the lowest evolutionary form of the Pokemon. It doesn’t list the legendaries because they’re genderless. Here is a mini-chart(again, from NickWhiz) to explain the main chart:

100% Female = 0-F

87.5% Female = 0-D

12.5% Male = E-F

75% Female = 0-B

25% Male = C-F

50% Female = 0-7

50% Male = 8-F

25% Female = 0-3

75% Male = 4-F

12.5% Female = 0-1

87.5% Male = 2-F

100% Male = 0-F

The gender is based on the Pokemon’s Attack DV. Use the values above with the chart below to approximately determine your Attack DV.

Note: For Nidoran M & F, the chart refers to breeding probability, not when seen in the wild.

Gender Listing